This topic contains 6 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Laura Childs 2 years, 7 months ago.

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  • #7363

    Sue Franklin
    Participant

    What kind of sugar substitute do you use? (I’ve never used any before.) And is Stevia in the Raw a good choice for a substitute? I just recently read an article about Truvia and all of the side effects it’s having on people so I’m not wanting to introduce that to my family. Any ideas on what I can use? I’m dying to try the scone recipe from the Low Carb High Fat diet book!

  • #7364
    Veronica
    Veronica
    Keymaster

    Hi Sue!

    In the beginning we used a liquid Stevia product that we picked up at our health food store. We later switched to BetterStevia Organic made by NOW Foods. They sell a variety of flavored and non-organic sweeteners and we were happy with the organic label.

    In the last few months we’ve been buying the actual dried and ground stevia herb. (It is green though so it might look odd in the scones.) And, because our sweet tooth has diminished we sometimes use local honey or pure maple syrup if a recipe needs just a touch of sweetness. Doing so often feels safer than a processed sugar substitute (even stevia) even though cravings for sweet foods might return for a day after eating any type of sugar (natural or processed).

  • #7365

    Sue Franklin
    Participant

    So, could you use honey for the scones instead of the sugar substitute? We have honey that we’ve bought from our small local health food store that has been locally sourced from our immediate area. We use it to battle our allergies, but my husband and I have stayed away from it while starting the diet. What are the ramifications of re-introducing that type of sugar into our systems so early on?

  • #7366
    Veronica
    Veronica
    Keymaster

    You can use honey instead of sugar substitute – but you’re right, early on in the diet it probably isn’t a good idea. I can run the nutritional numbers for you later today but my first thought is that your net carbs would nearly double per scone. I will run the numbers using honey at 1/3 cup, and then 1/4 cup and see if I can upload some screen captures of the nutritional data…

  • #7375

    Laura Childs
    Participant

    Not sure how this will turn out or if it will show here, but here’s the nutrition data for two different recipe alterations on the scones.

    Altering the low carb scone recipe by using 1/4 cup honey with blueberries…
    Making scones using 1/4 cup honey and blueberries.

    Altering the Scones recipe using stevia and raspberries…
    Making Scones with Stevia and Raspberries

  • #7376

    Sue Franklin
    Participant

    Good thing I used Stevia!

  • #7377

    Laura Childs
    Participant

    I agree!

    Stevia is a blessing when you just need a little sweetness. And honey has its place too.

    The trouble is that we’ve grown so accustomed to sweet tastes that we have become desensitized to the other tastes. Aside from blood glucose and cravings, after a few months of eating this way many are surprised that almonds taste sweet, as does dairy – all on their own. Veronica will eat an apple now and find that some are almost too sweet. I’m giving away her secrets but given that a few years ago (in college) she could easily eat 1/4 of a box of Captain Crunch with a double-sugar coffee on the side, I am amazed at how our taste buds ‘reset’.

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